Bulletin Vol. 1 No. 5 Nov 1964

T H E C H I N E S E U N I V E R S I T Y O F H O N G K O N G T H E U N I V E R S I T Y BULLETIN V O L U M E O N E N O V E M B E R , 1 9 6 4 N U M B E R F I V E CONTENTS Page A Solid Foundation ............................1 C o n v e r s io n .................................................3 Inaugural Addresses ............................3 Board o f Studies ...................................4 A .C.U. Membership ............................6 Additional Senate Members . 6 Acting V ic e - P r e s id e n t............................6 College Deans of Facul ti es . . . . 7 New University S t a f f ............................9 College R e p o r t s ..........................................9 Obituary: Dr. Vermier Y. Chi u . . . 1 0 A SOLID FOUNDATION (The follow ing are excerpts from the vice-chancellor's Statement on the Supplementary Budget of 1964/65 and the Annual Budget of 1965/66 pre sented to the University Council on November 24, 1964) O n Un iv er s i ty De v e lopmen t University teaching fo r the first two years of the 4-year curriculum is handled by each of the Colleges with more or less common syllabuses; inter-collegiate teaching either at a college or at a central location w ill be given as far as possible fo r the last two years. In addition, there w ill be university-wide facilities for faculty re search and postgraduate training, and such other uni versity-wide activities as extra-mural programmes. The development during the University's first year has been gratifying. The three Foundation Colleges have been operating more and more as integral parts o f the University, and the three Col­ lege Presidents have developed into a smooth work­ ing team w ith the Vice-Chancellor in dealing w ith all policy issues o f the University. Eleven professors have been appointed. The academic and administrative staff of the Colleges have been converted from the college salary scale to the University scale in accordance with the results of assessment by experts in the United Kingdom. Following the conversion, all the Senior Lecturers in the Colleges have received University appointments. The University Senate has been formed. Thirteen Directors of University Studies have been appointed and as many Boards of Studies have also been set up and are already in operation. The principle of inter-collegiate teaching has been extended to all Third and Fourth Year courses offer­ ed in the three Colleges, although distances and other physical difficulties have confined its applica­ tion to only a small number of courses at the pre­ sent. Thus a solid foundation has been laid fo r build­ ing up the University into an institution of higher learning." On I nsti tutes and Research The University-wide establishments constitute the core of the central ad­ ministration in University development. A university cannot be brought into existence if its attention is focussed on only undergraduate teaching. As a university, it must provide facilities fo r its faculty members to do research and to give training to postgraduates. To the university, research is indispensable because it serves directly the needs of the community, enables the faculty members to keep up with the newest developments in human knowledge and to make contributions to it, and enriches undergradate teaching and postgraduate training. Moreover, research w ill enable the university to attract and keep able staff; a good salary without the provision of research facilities fo r self-improve

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy NDE2NjYz